Inspiring Domain Name Flips List

New readers to the blog: Welcome! Please read What is this Blog About. It explains how I am an experienced ccTLD domainer, but completely new to .com domain investing. You may also like to read about My Domain Investing Journey So Far.


$1.3 Million Dollars for Men.com!

In 2008, one of the first things that attracted me to the possibilities of Domain Investing, were the amazing sales of domain names for over $1 million dollars. Usually these sales were for the very best keywords out there, names like Men.com and Loans.com.

These stories of million dollar domain sales are pretty exciting. But they are like lottery wins – rare.

I remember around this time reading an article, which is about the infamous Kevin Ham with his amazing story and domain successes. I believe I also read this article around the same time about Frank Schilling.

The industry titans who sell domains for millions have usually been working in the domain industry for many years. As with any success, it takes a lot of perseverance, sweat and tears.

suitcase-cash

When you hear that a domain name sold for $1 million, for some reason the mind starts to think that any domain name must have a high value. So you go out and register anything you can, thinking that you will get a nice pay day. But of course that just isn’t the case.

Domain names don’t work on a sliding scale where you get to cash any domain name in for money – you need a buyer who really wants it.

Rick Schwartz, the Domain King talks about Need, Want and Desire. The reason he was able to sell Men.com for $1.3 million is because that domain name was the best in that category. There was no better alternative domain name, which increased need, want and desire to the million dollar level.

A domain name only has value because somebody desires it. If the domain is not desirable, no sale. The key is to learn what makes a domain name desirable.

These million dollar sales were for domain names that the buyers, usually businesses, thought were desirable, and would make them their money back. The fact that people do pay into the millions for domain names, shows their value.

My First .com Domain Purchases Were Worthless

As I talked about in My Domain Investing Journey, I bought a few .com domains about 10 years ago. I think I registered HotWaterHeatPumps.com. A stunning 4 word domain – not!

After no one bought my few domains, I gave up. I thought “Oh this doesn’t work”. It took me many, many years to come back to the possibility of reselling domains. It was really the Domain Sherpa show that did this in 2011.

In Domain Sherpa’s earliest interviews, they interviewed the Domainers with the big stories, the million dollar sales and purchases. Even if those are hard to repeat for newer investors, they are still great stories.

But what Domain Sherpa did after interviewing all whole bunch of people with the big domain successes, was interview domain investors with smaller successes. Stories of ‘average’ people, with full time jobs who made good money buying and selling domains, just on a smaller scale.

domain-sherpa-logo

Domain Sherpa launched a new segment for these smaller sales which were called Profitable Flips. These shows really got me inspired! Here were everyday people who were having success with domains. By publishing these ‘average’ stories, Domain Sherpa opened up the possibility in my mind of actually being able to make money buying and selling ‘lesser’ domains.

So I started opening my mind back up to the possibility of Domain Investing. I was always good at spelling, and for some reason I was drawn to the concept of hunting to find a bargain, to later sell it at a profit.

You Can Buy and Sell Domains Profitably

The reason for this article is to encourage new domainers. Million dollar domain name sales are generally made by those who bought domains 5 – 10 years ago or longer. That is just not achievable for a new domainer. If something looks too hard, people give up.

But every day hundreds of domain names sell for “reasonable prices”, by average investors. The profits can be quite large if you buy a domain right. But you need to learn, research, test, test again, and get some sales under your belt.

Becoming a profitable domain name investor on a small scale is definitely achievable if you have the patience to study and learn.

I wanted to write this post to document the smaller domain sales, so that new domain investors can be inspired. I want to show that everyday people can have success with domains. You don’t need to sell a domain name for a million dollars to be successful.

Inspiring Profitable Flips – Ranked By Lowest Buy Price

These inspiring domain name sales are pulled from the Profitable Flips segment of Domain Sherpa Shows. You can actually watch a video interview with the person who sold each domain name. There you can learn all about how they bought, and how they sold the domain.

I have ranked them by the lowest buy price. You don’t need to spend a lot of money to find a good domain name to invest in, you just need to hunt hard!

DOMAIN BUY SELL PROFIT SELLER SHOW
MaxHolmes.com NEW 12 1,900 1,888 Matt Holmes Private
CBDRemedy.com 27 10,000 9,973 Marty Pelletier Watch
SmartMonday.com 69 14,488 14,419 Logan Flatt Watch
Prop.bet 111 6,500 6,389 Jon Arsenault Watch
In-Sight.com 217 15,500 15,283 George Adu Watch
TopOffers.com 550 10,000 9,450 David Kelly Watch
Karpool.com NEW 627 6,500 5,873 Mike Cyger Source
Strahovka.com 711 62,000 61,289 Rod Atkinson Watch
Give.io 800 15,800 15,000 Joshua Schoen Watch
ItalianWeddings.com 1,000 9,000 8,000 Chris Reams Watch
PirateShip.com 1,500 20,000 18,500 Daniel Levi Watch
BreakBread.com 2,033 22,000 19,967 Drew Rosener Watch
BuyShares.com 2,244 15,900 13,656 Kevin Macphers Watch
eSoft.com 3,000 30,000 27,000 Joshua Reason Watch
Hatred.com 4,000 150,000 146,000 Richard Dynas Watch
Tigra.com 5,500 28,500 23,000 Chris Reams Watch
Statement.com 9,000 140,000 131,000 Braden Pollock Watch

I keep going back to these domain flips for inspiration, as I start my .com investing journey. I hope you find inspiration in these flips too! Thanks to Domain Sherpa for conducting all these inspiring interviews!

Add Your Own Profitable Flip Here!

If you know of any other publicly listed domain name flips, with an initial purchase under $1,000? Please let me know and I will add them to this list.

If you have any personal domain flips (and you have screenshots or other verification) please let me know and I can add your flip to the table, and link to you.

Criteria: Flips with a profit of at least $1000, and an initial purchase price less than $1,000.

The lower the price point, the better, to help inspire others with a small amount of capital to invest!

Comment below or tweet me @NZDomainer

My Domain Portfolio…REVEALED

New readers to the blog: Welcome! Please read What is this Blog About. It explains how I am an experienced ccTLD domainer, but completely new to .com domain investing. You may also like to read about My Domain Investing Journey So Far.


Thankyou!

I’d like to thank everyone for their support of the NZDomainer blog so far. It is always nice to receive email feedback, blog comments, shares, and interaction on Twitter. It has been super encouraging as a new website, to see new people discover and read the posts. It is fuel to continue on this journey of documenting my entry to the .com market.

I am still currently in the research phase, as I study the market and the different strategies out there. I am not rushing out trying to fill my .com portfolio with junk – there will be no 2am hand registering sprees here! I am researching .com niches to see what fits my experience, budget and ROI time line.

I do enjoy the NZ domain market but there is a lot of waiting involved. There is no wholesale market whatsoever. No domain brokers. No one bothers with numerics, except for single numbers, which are obviously super rare.

But with .com there are dozens of ways to attack the domain industry: Brandables, Generics, Numerics and every niche off of those. Wholesaling, Brokering etc. I see so much opportunity!

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What Kind of Local Domains do I own as a New Zealand Domainer?

I have had a couple of people curious as to my domain experience in the New Zealand market. So I thought I would list a few domains that I own, which may speak a little to my domain tastes.

Some favourites from my portfolio are:

Florist.co.nz
SolarPower.co.nz
Beauty.co.nz
4.co.nz
Boom.co.nz
Stream.co.nz
Fun.co.nz
Gourmet.co.nz
Reviews.co.nz

This is by no means an exhaustive list, but I wanted to showcase a little of my domain journey to date. These domains have been acquired over many years and YES, I wish I all of these were in .com! Anyone keen on exact .com swaps let me know!

I have also had some readers reach out to me about the possibilities of selling .coms into the New Zealand market. Unfortunately New Zealand businesses are not big on .com. NZ businesses only use .co.nz.

New Zealand Businesses Don’t Use .Com

As we are so far away from most major trading markets, NZ businesses tend to only sell within New Zealand, so we have no use for .com. A .com implies a business would sell globally, and very few NZ businesses sell globally.

The one exception would be in the accommodation industry. As these kind of businesses are trying to attract foreign visitors, some do use .com. But outside of the accommodation sector, 99.9% of NZ businesses use .co.nz.

So apologies, there isn’t some big untapped market down here for .com domains. I can’t tell you the last time I saw a .com in the wild here, on a billboard, vehicle or sign. I literally cannot remember one. But .co.nz all day.

There is a good reason I am setting my domaining sights outside of New Zealand. The domain market here is tiny, and not enough to make a full time living on. We only have 4 million people here, which is the population of Los Angeles as one country.

But I am really enjoying focussing more on .com and all discovering all the resale opportunities that just don’t exist in my market! I will be starting to share my research process in .com as a newbie / old hand, here in future posts. Watch this space!

keyboard-typing

Between posts, I am active on Twitter! Please tweet or follow @NZDomainer

Do you own any localized domain names other than com, net or org?

How do you find sales in local or Country Code domain extensions?

 

Why I Joined DNAcademy

New readers to the blog: Welcome! Please read What is this Blog About. It explains how I am an experienced ccTLD domainer, but completely new to .com domain investing. You may also like to read about My Domain Investing Journey So Far.


What is DNAcademy?

DNAcademy is a online course where people can learn how to become successful domain name investors. The course is also billed as a way for corporate executives to learn about premium domain names, and how they can use them to benefit their organizations.

Michael Cyger who founded the informational site DomainSherpa.com (now sold) is the creator of the DNAcademy course. Through conducting hundreds of interviews with all the movers and shakers in the domain name industry, Michael has built up a vast knowledge in all facets of the Domain Name industry.

dn academy

DomainSherpa started because Michael was trying to learn about the world of domain name investing. He started as a complete newbie to the industry, but over the years of producing the show, he became a trusted industry figure in his own right. His work with Domain Sherpa has helped thousands of people learn more about Domain names.

Anyone who has watched Michael conduct a Domain Sherpa interview will know that he has a very thorough approach and leaves no viewer behind. If a concept starts to get complex, he stops and asks the expert to break it down, so even the layperson can understand it.

Michael goes very deep into the details, and gets the expert to share crucial information that I’m sure not many of them had planned on sharing. So many times I have been listening to a show and while a topic was being discussed, I thought to myself “but why did they do it that way” and Michael somehow chimes in with the exact same question of to the expert.

So Michael Cyger is the perfect person to create the ultimate domain name course. He has a skill of breaking down complicated concepts to easy to understand pieces. The DN Academy course is the culmination of his acquired knowledge, research and his personal experience growing from scratch to become a successful domain name investor.

So Why Take a Course if You Are Already Experienced?

As I have covered in previous posts, I am a successful domain name investor already, however my experience has been solely in the ccTLD domain extension of “.co.nz” in New Zealand.

The Domain Sherpa show primarily discusses the largest domain market: .com. I have been a Domain Sherpa viewer since 2011, and I have been absorbing knowledge about the domain industry in general ever since then.

The general concepts around domain names are universal: They are essential for branding, they have a value, and good ones are becoming harder to obtain. However each niche in the domain name industry requires a new skill set. I have mastered the .co.nz niche, but I have no experience in .com investing.

While I understand the general concepts around what makes a domain valuable, and how to sell a domain name – I don’t know the specifics of .com valuations. There are a lot of ways to approach .com investing, a lot of marketplaces, and a lot of pitfalls to watch out for including US trademarks.

When I will be investing thousands of dollars into acquiring .com domain names each year, any extra insight I can get will save me thousands.

save thousands of dollars

I have known about the course for a couple of years. When I finally decided to start investing in .com domains in August 2018, I joined the course within a few days.

With so many new areas to learn about I thought, why not go straight to the source, and learn from the teacher I have already been learning from for so many years. I am already very glad I did.

How is the Course Going?

I paid for it, so why not take the thing from the very beginning! So I have gone back to school as it were, and it has been great. In the first beginner quiz, I only ended up getting 86% the first time round. Proof that everyone, no matter what level you are at, can benefit from a refresher.

I am currently part way through the course, and it is so well done. Everything is broken down step by step in super logical order. My Mother could go through this course and become a domain name investor – that’s how thorough the course has been so far!

I have also skipped ahead to check out some sections towards the end of the course. I’ve already learned a negotiation technique I know will save me thousands over the next few years! My investment in the course has already paid for itself.

The Course is a Great Way to Fast Track Your Learning About Domain Names

The Domain Sherpa shows are a very useful resource in the domain name industry. However the knowledge is spread out across hundreds of interviews. I love the interview format, however for a beginner there hasn’t been a structured way to learn everything you need to be a successful domain name investor.

There are hundreds of courses around real estate investing, and stock market investing – but none about domain name investing. This course is designed to take a complete newbie to an educated domain name investor, without the years of trial and error.

Sure you can do your own research, read articles, and make your own costly mistakes –  but when there is a complete course available you would be silly not to utilise it.

When you start out in domaining, you buy a whole bunch of domain names you *think* are valuable. This course explains exactly why some domains are valuable, and some are never going to make you anything. I’m cringing at the hundreds of domains I’ve purchased (and dropped) that I thought were great at the time. If I had this course, I would have saved all that time and money.

For anyone new to the potential of investing in Domain names, this course should be at the top of your list. Perhaps I will sign my mother up, so she can understand what the hell I am talking about when I talk to her about what I do with domain names!

ticking-off-the-course

I will keep you posted with my progress through the course…

(As a student, I’m happy to answer any questions about the course too. Comment below, tweet me, or send me an email via the contact form.)

You can learn more about the course at DNAcademy.com

I Just Hand-Registered the Perfect .com!

New readers to the blog: Welcome! Please read What is this Blog About. It explains how I am an experienced ccTLD domainer, but completely new to .com domain investing. You may also like to read about My Domain Investing Journey So Far.


I registered my FIRST CHOICE Domain Name. How rare is that?

I recently made my second .com investment! Like my first .com purchase, I again had some trouble with the purchase – but luckily not a potential trademark issue this time.

The domain is I bought was: NZDomainer.com. Obviously nzdomainer.wordpress.com just wasn’t going to cut it for a domain blog!

So I went to the world’s number 1 domain registrar……… Read on to hear about the trouble I experienced…

Distraction has been a big challenge for me the past few weeks. We are almost ready to put our house on the market. We have never done this before, and it is a big, stressful jump into the unknown.

Anything to take my mind away from all the work still to be done, and the people I need to wrangle to make this all happen, is welcome.

Twitter, Google, Food, My phone – anything seems more exciting than slaving away out doors, getting the house ready for sale.

One of the best ways to procrastinate getting your house ready to sell, is to start a domain blog. I will tell you, blogging is a very effective way to avoid physical labour!

I have been trying my best to avoid time-wasting ‘crutches’ like Google. The internet is a distraction machine, full of blue links which promise more enlightenment – if you will just click one more time.

In my efforts to stay away from Google for a few weeks, I got thinking. Why even use Google? 90% of the time we are going to the same websites day after day – why do we have Google search so readily available on all our devices?

When we know what website we want to visit, why do we search on Google for it anyway? Searching means another step, and more distraction on the way there.

google-logo.png

But Google or Apple were conspiring against me when I typed ‘Godaddy’ into my Safari App. There is only one Godaddy, take me to the site please. But alas, I am greeted by a page of search results.

Is anyone like me, and NEVER click on Google Ads? I spent many years publishing websites where Google Adsense was the main revenue source. Google’s number one rule when you are an Adsense publisher is to never click your own ads.

So for fear of getting my Google Adsense account shutdown (it provided a full time income) I somehow trained myself to never click on any Google Ad – my own, or anyone elses for that matter!

To this very day, whenever I do a Google search, I always scroll down past the ads ,to click on the organic results. Even if the Google ad is for the website I want!

Is this just me?

I guess there is also a part of me that sees through marketing. I like to be a conscious consumer. I don’t just go clicking any link, it better be giving me the exact thing I am after.

To me, the first organic result is what I want, and I ALWAYS scroll past the ads. Anyone else the same?

I remember watching a friend do a Google search once. They searched, and instantly clicked on the very first link on the page – which of course was an ad. I was taken aback! “You know that’s an ad right? That is not necessarily the best website, it’s just an ad at the very top of the page!” But I was greeted with a “Meh, I dunno.”

Do most average consumers always click the first result whatever it is? Is the trust in Google that automatic? Probably. 20 years of search training.

godaddy-logo.png

Anyway, back to GoDaddy…. you can see how easy it is for me to get distracted. The house will never be ready at this rate!

But after avoiding Google lately, it was actually my friend this time. I scrolled down to click on the first organic GoDaddy result, but something caught my eye. GoDaddy was offering $1.25 .coms!

Could this be one of the few times in my life where I actually click on a Google Ad? For a $1.25 .com, that I am about to buy anyway – hell yes. So I went against my nature and actually clicked on a Google Ad. I’m so dramatic.

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I then took the scary step that all new business owners take. That all new bloggers take, that any one who wants to put an idea on the internet takes. I searched for the domain name I wanted. NZDomainer.com.

godaddy-domains-nz-2.png

And success! NZDomainer.com was available! I mean, no one else would ever register a domain like this. There are like 10 actual NZ domainers, and they are a very secretive bunch. Not the types to go around talking about domaining. Especially not on a website.

New Zealand suffers from ‘tall poppy syndrome’ where if one person stands out a little, they get chopped down. It’s cultural thing, and I think this phenomenon is quite common in smaller countries.

In a country where everyone is your neighbour, everyone is your equal. When somebody works on something that may set them a little ahead than everyone else, they need to be pulled back down. Otherwise everyone has to do more work to keep up! What a terrible way to live.

It’s not really this bad, but there are certainly instances where people get jealous of anyone getting ahead. I’m sure it is common everywhere, but especially in smaller countries.

So my point is, that my FIRST CHOICE .com domain name was available! Who else can say that? Who says hand-regging is dead!

Jokes. Hand-registering domains IS dead… for domains that more than one person might want anyway. (Except for new, cutting edge terms obviously).

So NZDomainer.com was available, and at a nice price of $1.25! I added it to my cart.

godaddy-domains-nz-3

Whenever I have purchased a brand new domain from a registrar, I always get a little worried that by the time I check out it will be gone. Rick Schwartz has told many stories on his blog of the exciting mid 90s dotcom gold rush. One of my favourite was where he would look up the Whois of domain he wanted to register, and someone had just registered it minutes before he got there! What a thing to witness.

I actually did personally witness something kind of similar to this, but 1000 times less lucrative, in the .CO gold rush of 2010. But I will save that blog post for another day. Ha ha!

So after telling GoDaddy that I didn’t want Privacy, I didn’t want hosting, and I didn’t want a foot rub, I made my way to the check out. Can you guess what happened next?

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My $1.25 .com was now $27.92! Hmm.

So I tried again. And again. And again. I emptied my cart. I logged in, I  logged out. I went back to Google. I clicked on the ad (again – very hard). My precious domain was $1.25 in my cart each time, but $23.99 at the checkout. ($27.92 New Zealand Dollars = $18.61 USD).

So I cried a little, cursed a little. I swore that I would not pay a standard renewal when it said $1.25 on the previous page. I did what anyone would do and I went to a different registrar.

To be honest, because the domain was for a project, I didn’t really want it in my GoDaddy account anyway. I like to keep all my domains for actual websites in separate registrar accounts from any investment domains.

So I went to my favourite NZ registrar 1stDomains and registered it there. It turned out to be lower than the GoDaddy price. Go figure. But GoDaddy push makes things super simple, so I will of course be back to the big G, to hold my domain investments.

Now, I have a ‘slightly’ more official sounding blog. NZDomainer.com. Welcome!

I do have to give a little plug for WordPress here. The WordPress.com system is super easy to use. I was able to transition over to the new domain very easily. The domain was live on the internet about 3 hours after purchase.

When you are starting a new project (like a blog), the thing is to keep momentum. I personally don’t want to be mucking around with hosting my own WordPress somewhere. The point is to focus on writing, and not get stuck in the details of plugin this, theme that.

So I hope you will excuse the rough edges of the blog for now. There aren’t many bells and whistles, special features or pictures of my cat. Yet.

The race is on, to keep writing and writing and writing. Before I get pulled to the dark side, which is the physical labour hell of finishing this house!

I just want to start researching and buying names! Maybe when we sell the house I should use all the money to buy some killer one worders?

Connect with me on Twitter

Did I screw up my first .com Domain Investment?

New readers to the blog: Welcome! Please read What is this Blog About. It explains how I am an experienced ccTLD domainer, but completely new to .com domain investing. You may also like to read about My Domain Investing Journey So Far.


I excitedly drafted this post the morning I won the auction. As the weekend wore on, I realised I may have made a mistake with this, my first .com investment. Read on to find out where I may have gone wrong…

I Won My First GoDaddy Domain Auction!

So, I just won my first GoDaddy Expired Domain auction! This is my very first investment in my journey as a new .com domain investor. The domain is HaloSolar.com. I have been watching this domain all week, so it’s feels great to finally have it!

I discovered it in the GoDaddy expiring domains list at the beginning of the week. The name immediately popped out to me. For starters it is in the solar space, which is a growing industry with a high ticket price for the product. This should mean a higher price for a domain in this industry.

I also love the Halo part. Halo as a keyword has many good connotations. Part of what makes a keyword valuable are it’s connotations. Andrew Rosener always talks about the ‘connotations’ inherent to a particular word, and this is the perfect example of a word with positive connotations.

Halo means good, could also mean holy, etc. Halo as a keyword could be put in front of almost any word, and it instantly makes a brand very positive. Halo is a great brand. And of course Halo and Solar together just has a nice ring to it! It is easy to spell, and has that double syllable sound like Coca Cola. “Co-ca Coal-a”, “Hay-lo Soul-a”.

Apparently one’s brain will pick up on repeating sounds. When a melody or rhythm is easy to remember, this is part of the reason why songs get stuck in your head. I heard once that Coca Cola is one of the best brands names ever created. Co-ca Coal-la has both rhyming sounds (ca and la) AND has a repeating rhythm (da da, da da). It repeats in your ear again, after you hear it. It is an “earworm”.

We are getting super high level here…

Not that this domain is anywhere near Coca Cola brand level, but you get the drift. It potentially has some extra branding push going for it. Anything that sticks in your head, you retain. When it comes to branding, sticking in peoples brains is the name of the game. (Gee, listen to the domainer falling in love with their own domain name).

The Auction

45 minutes out from the auction end, I fired up my app and computer to get set up. I am new to GoDaddy Auctions, so I was not sure how to bid and I didn’t even know if my credit card was loaded up or not.

The auction for HaloSolar.com had sat with no bids all week. I checked the GoDaddy Investor app, but overnight the auction had already risen from the $12 minimum bid. A couple of other similar names I was watching had significant bids, so I was just hoping no one had seen HaloSolar!

After making sure my credit card was loaded I placed my very first .com auction bid!

But…someone must have had a proxy bid set up because I was instantly outbid. So as we all do, I started to get swept up in the bidding process. The bidding went all the way up to $95.

This was my first auction, and first potential purchase, so I set a cap of $100 for this auction, or I would walk away.

As the auction counted down I placed my final bid of $100. I was sure I would get out-bid. I kept refreshing as the final 2 minutes ticked down!

At 0 seconds, I still held the final bid at $100! I had just won my first .com auction, for a great name, at a great price!

Or so I thought…

Trademark Issue?

Earlier in the week I had an hour to kill waiting for someone, so I tried to navigate the GoDaddy Auctions platform on mobile. It is very hard to use on mobile. It seems strange that it doesn’t work well on iPhone.

HaloSolar was the best low bid domain I found, that was expiring soon. After almost giving up fighting the platform on mobile, I was happy to find a good domain I actually would buy.

It had been a very busy week for me, so I did not get a chance to do any research on this domain. After the auction, I had some time over the weekend, so I started to do some googling of Halo and Solar. It looks like there is HaloSolar.net ranking on the first page.

I decided to do a full check on the US Patent and Trademark Office website, to see what I could find. There was no formal trademark for “Halo Solar” luckily!

I thought there would be a lot more trademarks for the word “Halo”, but surprisingly there wasn’t. I checked each instance of a “Halo” trademark but none were in a solar classification. So I breathed a sigh of relief that I didn’t just do something stupid!

But then I started to think about it more. The folks using HaloSolar.net are currently using that as their brand, so while there is no formal trademark registered, do they have an unregistered trademark from existing use in commerce?

I don’t want to be involved in any potential trademark issues. I prefer easy sailing. I have always avoided trademarked terms in my .co.nz investing. You are going to get your ass handed to you in court, or a permanent record of the domain dispute against your name. Not worth it.

Something I Didn’t Think of

In the NZ market I usually buy one word domains. I almost never buy two word domains. I always buy generic one word terms only, words that could be good brands.

Because I am so used to buying one word domains, I almost never need to do NZ trademark searches. The nature of one word generic domains is that, even if there is existing use of that word, another business can use the word in a different trademark class or industry.

Accent Interiors and Accent Flowers can both use the brand ‘Accent’ without affecting each other. Buying Accent.com means you can sell it to anyone without any trademark issues. Generic one word-ers are the best investments, as any type of business can buy it from you. The more potential buyers, the more chance of a higher sale price.

The thing here though is that I bought a two word .com. When you move from one word to two words, you now have a brand that could be quite distinctive and unique.

With No Formal US Trademark, I Believe This Domain Name is Fine

Here is my thinking…

1. If there is no formal US trademark, surely Joe’s Plumbing in Kansas can operate without affecting Joe’s Plumbing in New York. Even if a local business has an unregistered trademark in Joes Plumbing, I doubt they are going to battle another firm in a different state?

2. Solar tends to be a localized business. There are very few national solar companies. Trade and Service Businesses tend to operate on a local level. I.e. a plumber is very unlikely to try to and build a national plumbing service – they will stay within a state, or at most a few states, if they are ambitious.

3. If a company was willing to become a national brand, they would surely register the trademark for their name. To me, the fact there is no formal trademark for Halo Solar means that the existing business on HaloSolar.net is happy to remain a local business, using the name locally in Illinois.

Lessons Learned for My Next Domain Investment

Research, research, research!

I made a rookie mistake on this purchase and didn’t do a trademark search BEFORE I bought the name! However luckily there is no formal US trademark for ‘Halo Solar’.

Steps to take when considering a domain to invest in:

1. Do a Trademark Search First.

Say I am buying a two word domain name/brand. If there are any existing trademarks, and it is a unique sounding combination of two words, then probably steer clear.

(Unless the two word phrase is very commonly used in culture, such as ‘Dream Big’. Names like this have mind share, and are harder to trademark. They could make great domain investments.)

2. Do a Comprehensive Google search.

If it looks like there is a business trying to build a national or global brand name around a term, but they don’t have a formal trademark, then likely avoid the name. Especially if they have been operating for a long time.

If they see the domain name has a new owner ,they may decide to defend their unregistered trademark rights to try and get the name. It is better to pick less riskier names unless the term is very generic.

As a newbie to .com investing, I am realising that they require a decent amount of research before going to auction.

I will be posting more about my thought patterns when researching and selecting my future domain name purchases. I can’t wait to get stuck in! Hopefully my stumbling along will help others, as I learn how to invest in this new world of .com.

Thanks for reading! Feel free to leave a comment below! Or give your opinion on this Twitter thread.

My Twitter is: @NZDomainer


Disclaimer: This blog post is not legal advice. Don’t take my word for anything. Do your own research.

My Domain Name Investing Journey so far

Hi I’m Adrian, a part-time domainer from New Zealand. I have been interested in domains for over 10 years ever since first having some for various online businesses.

You Can Sell a Domain Name for a Million Dollars?

I was inspired to get into domains after hearing about domain names selling for millions. I soon learned that most of these high value domain sales were purchased in the 90s so it is not easily repeatable.

But over the years I picked up from various places that any domain name could be sold for a profit – you just needed a willing buyer. And so the journey began.

As usual, I bought I bunch of crappy domains. I may have registered about 10 or so. Obviously never sold any. Dropped them and gave up. But I always kept an interest as I kept hearing about people being able to do it.

After my initial failure with .com I decided to try investing in New Zealand domains, which end in .co.nz. I already owned a bunch for my various online businesses. So I started buying expired names in .co.nz. I thought I knew what a good domain was.

This was around 2008 when keyword domains were all the rage. Names like SkateboardWheels.com or WashingMachines.com. Put a domain extension on the end and they were hot. Mind you I never sold any.

I bought a lot of names, that if they were .coms would have been great names. But in the tiny NZ market, they were worthless. I was wasting a lot of money, and with the high renewal prices of .co.nz ($25 NZD / $18 USD). At the time .coms were around $9 USD. It didn’t stop me buying and hoping though.

No One Wants To Buy My Domain Names…

I eventually worked out how to put an offer page on the domains. But due to the crappiness of most of the names, I never really sold any that way. My landing page was really crappy, and it didn’t say Domain for sale, it was just a contact form.

So as people thought it was a website, I got genuine enquiries about whatever product the domain names suggested the site was about.

I stumbled across the Domain Sherpa website and show very early on. I think it launched in 2011. I have been a big fan ever since and have listened to every single show/podcast! That is about 400 shows. So I learned a lot over the years from all the guests.

I slowly got better at buying .co.nz domains. I sold a few to businesses that I reached out to. But I really did hate bothering people. It was much better to have them come to you. However a mistake I made early on was that I assumed that because I knew how to use WHOIS to find a domain owner, that every one did.

So I sat and waited for people to someone look me up and offer to buy the name. It might have only happened once or twice in a few years. Meanwhile I had hundreds of domains slowly dying on the vine.

I Paid $5,000 for a .co.nz Domain Name!

About 2013 I needed to buy a domain for my girlfriends new startup. I knew that having a great name would really boost the business. We found a category killer in the New Zealand market, but the guy wanted $5,000. We ended up paying it due to the quality of the name, and the reputation and trust boost it would give us as a new business.

So after happily paying $5,000 for this name, it got me thinking, maybe I should get into this highly profitable domain business via local .co.nz domains. So I started really going deep and researching how to do it.

I started looking at domain names differently. Keyword domains were going out of favour due to Google changes where you couldn’t throw up a keyword site and rank easily any more.

I started to really analyse what made a name good. I learned a lot on the Domain Sherpa show. I loved the interviews host Michael Cyger did with guests about how they bought their domains name.

At some point Domain Sherpa started adding a new show format where 3 or 4 people would talk about domains they were buying. They were called the Domain Sherpa Review. The concept sounded kind of boring to me compared to the interviews of really good names being bought and sold for high prices.

So I literally never listened to a Domain Sherpa Review Shows for at least 6 months. I thought meh, boring, no value there. But the regular interviews I was very keen on. The problem was I was so up to date, and had listened to all the shows that I ran out of podcasts to listen to. I purposely avoided downloading the Review shows. But one day I had no regular Domain Sherpa show to listen to so I just gave it a try.

It wasn’t till I had listened to a few shows, that I realised listening to people who are buying and selling in the industry every day, was super valuable. The regular Domain Sherpa interviews were often interviews with people who had bought and sold domains for millions of dollars. They were exciting. But for the average joe domainer, they weren’t going to be able to do that.

My Domain Education Begins

So I started listening to the Domain Sherpa review shows religiously. I learned SO much from Rick Schwartz, Andrew Rosener, Shane Cultra, Michael Berkens, Michael Cyger (Host), and all the guest Sherpas that were on the show. I really loved it when Frank Schilling was on.

Rick Schwartz especially was influential to me in the early days, especially around the concept of branding, and I have read every single post on his blog. But I will leave that story for another post. With Rick Schwartz retired, these days Andrew Rosener is the industry leader dropping knowledge at a high level.

I still listen to every Domain Sherpa show to this day. After thinking they werent that interesting early on, The Domain Sherpa Review Show is my FAVOURITE segment – and I highly recommend them. Hearing about the day to day activities of investors in the industry, and their opinion of values of some randomly selected domain names, is so valuable.

In terms of my domaining, I learned what a good domain was. It was Andrew who spelled it out perfectly: “commercial value”. A good domain investment is one that a business would actually use. So I stopped buying domains that sounded good. And started buying names that businesses would actually use for their main website.

I had been buying domains that were exact match product names. While these have some value, a business usually isn’t going to call themselves the name of the products they sell. They won’t use WashingMachines.com, they will use WashWorld.com – a brand name.

So my domain buying strategy pivoted again. I was still investing only in .co.nz. The expiring names were pretty good, and there was little competition to buy them back then.

I was staying clear of .com because it was so much more competitive and expensive to get in to. I thought, if I can’t learn to how to make money in New Zealand Domains, I had no business getting into the competitive .com market.

So over the next 2-3 years I kept refining my strategy. I have about 500 domain names in my domain buying history. They got better over the years as I learned more and more. Big ups to Michael Cyger! I have learned so much from his work with Domain Sherpa. He now runs DNAcademy.

It Took 3 Years for me to Sell a Domain close to $1,000

In early 2016 I started getting some good sales. (Good for the NZ market). I sold two names for around $900. This was my first real success at domaining. I was about 8 years in from my very first crappy .coms.

I had been buying .co.nz names for about 4 years, every now and then. I was never really going very hard. I would buy a name here and there. I never really had many sales until these 2 names @ $900 each, quite soon after each other.

It was these two sales, that really taught me the most about what worked in the NZ market. And that was one word, generic, category killers.

0 to 7 Figure Sales on a Category Killer Domain

Speaking of Category Killers…that $5,000 domain I had purchased for my girlfriends startup in 2013 was proving it’s worth. We had built that business up to 7 figures in around 2 1/2 years.

There were obviously many factors that played in this success but I think the category killer domain played a massive part. Both in terms of branding and conveying authority, but also in saving on PPC advertising cost via the domain name being exact match to the industry.

Everything you knew was wrong

So now I knew what worked I started paying a lot more attention to the expiring lists. I stopped buying shitty exact match product names that sounded good, but no business would ever pay that much for. I focused on one worders exclusively.

I had about 150 .co.nz current names at this point. A good chunk of them were pigeon shit. I believe you can sell almost any domain outbound, but the time involved is probably not worth it. So I let a whole bunch drop. It was hard to let so many drop, but I knew they would never sell, simply waiting for inbound inquiries.

It was at this time that Efty (the domain selling platform) launched. You load your names up and they have a nice, simple clear landing page. My domains at that time either had a white simple contact form of them which did not say Domain for Sale. Kind of dumb really.

Again I just assumed because I lived in the WHOIS system researching the hell out of the NZ market, that people would know how to find a domain owner.

So I loaded all names up on Efty. It didn’t take long to receive a few offers. In fact I started receiving offers quite regularly. It was quite nice to see people interested in the domains I had bought.

The thing I found with offers was that they were always low ball. When I emailed the price, most people ran off. Or worse they told me I was crazy. I was not asking for high prices. But I took the enquiries to completed sales ratio as a sign – something was wrong.

It took me about a year to learn that it was good to put a price on the domain. It saved my time by weeding out dreamers, and set expectations in the buyers minds as to the price level they needed to be at.

At this time I was actually starting to sell domains. It was every few months, but I would get some good sales. The best thing about these sales was the feedback they provided. They started to show me what kinds of domains would sell.

So this further improved my buying strategy – which I was super happy about. The problem was I kept learning that domains I thought were amazing a year ago, were absolutely crap! More purging of dozens of crap domains!

“Anyone who isn’t embarrassed of who they were last year, probably isn’t learning enough.” – Alain de Botton

I Cracked the .co.nz Domain Code

So over the past 2 years, I have started to get regular sales under my belt. I have learned what makes a domain desirable to a New Zealand business. I have learned how to price them to the local market.

In New Zealand, you can’t delete a domain, you have to wait the full year out to drop it. So that bad decision stares you in the face for a long time! Each month at renewal time, I shake my head at domains I thought were amazing a year ago!

I have just done my final purge of crappy domains from last year. There was a big release by the registry of some keyword names that were held. So it was a mini gold rush all over again, just like .com in the 90s – or so I thought

But soon after buying them I realised they “sounded good” but they weren’t actually good domains. Kind of like the .CO Gold Rush of 2011, or the gTLD Gold Rush of 2015. These NZ Gold Rush 2.0 domains are expiring around about now. I have about 30 of them left. My domain portfolio is now the SMALLEST it has every been, yet I have never had so many sales.

I have really cracked how the NZ domain market works. Usually I can buy a domain, and it will be sold within 6 months. I learned over the years that I hate outreach, so I never contact a business to sell a domain. All my sales are inbound. Inbound is great because you get a higher price, as the person actually wants the domain.

A 10 Year Journey

So we are here in 2018. It was 2008 when I bought my first crappy .coms. Granted, I have only seriously been into domains for the last 4 years. I have had various businesses that have taken up a lot of my time, so I have always left domains on the back burner as a part time hobby.

But with the increased sales over the past year, I have proven to myself that I can buy the right domains, at the right price, and sell them for a good return. I finally know how to invest in the NZ market successfully!

My Problem

The problem I have now is a funny one. There is not enough .co.nz domain inventory to make a full time income doing it.

New Zealand is a country of just 4 million people. There are around 600,000 domains registered. This would seem like the land of opportunity if we were talking .com. But with such a small country, there is just not the number of businesses for two word domains to be worth investing in.

So, I have a problem. I am at my limit in the NZ Domain market. I have the skills to hunt for domains, but there is very little opportunity to buy profitably. I will always keep investing in the NZ market, but I need something else. I think it is finally time for me the enter the .com market.

Entering the .Com Market

I know the .com market will be similar, but still very different when it comes to names. I know what makes a domain good in NZ (one worders), but one words in .com are very expensive. I don’t have the budget to buy one word .coms at this point. They generally seem $10,000 a piece, give or take.

So I will need to work in two word .coms. I don’t have much recent experience with those. And the exact match two word domain experience I have from 2008-2010, no longer applies.

I currently weed out so many one worders in .co.nz, that would be killer in .com. So I am going to have to train myself in two worders.  Also I am used to working with a smaller budget. Even Two Worders in .com are 000s to 0000s. It could be quite hard for me to adjust to investing more in each name. So this is going to be a very interesting exercise!

Why Start This Blog Then?

The thing with New Zealand, is everyone knows everyone (almost). We joke that there are 2 degrees of separation, not the usual 6 degrees. When a business is launched, you are not far off competing with someone you know.

The domain market too, is quite small. There are about 10 domain investors here. Probably 6 have a good stash of names from the early 2000s. Probably only 3 (including myself) make a good volume of sales. So we are always stepping on each others toes.

I couldn’t write a domain blog about how to buy NZ Domains, the audience would be about 50 people. And discussing my strategies would be counter-intuitive in such a small market.

But .com is a massive market, I am a newbie, and I don’t have a strategy! I also have a tendency to over-analyse, so while I am over-analysing I can write it down and share it – for my own reference, and for others.

Not Your Typical Domain Investing Newbie?

I think that I will also bring a different perspective to .com investing. This will not be a typical newbie’s blog. It took me probably 4 years to learn what a good domain really is. And another 2 years to refine that. All the while spending/wasting thousands on crappy domains.

I have probably churned through 500 domains in my “domain career”. Mind you, I have never hand registered domains, but even expiring domains can be crap.

So I am hoping my journey in .com will be a little faster than the typical newbie domainer. I already know what a good domain is. I know for the most part how to negotiate and set prices. But that is for .co.nz domains. .Com is going to be different.

I think my perspective on domaining will be unique, as I am coming from a ccTLD perspective. I think my journey will be interesting for others to follow along with, and hopefully as I learn .com, the things I learn will be useful to others.

I have checked the New Zealand expiring domain lists every night for the past 3 years, so I’m hoping this will put me in good stead for scrolling the endless daily lists of expiring .coms. That being said, perhaps I am just an overconfident newbie! Given the size and competition I may totally suck at .com.

I Will Be Documenting Every Step of My Process and Journey

I love hearing about domaining on the Domain Sherpa Review show, so I want to discuss domaining with this blog and on my Twitter. I will be documenting my learning process from keyword research, to buying, to negotiating and selling.

I have never shared any of my strategies on domaining, or business for that matter. But by growing my investing outside of .co.nz and into .coms, I think it is a good time to start sharing my thinking and strategy. I’m new anyway, I have nothing to lose!

The book “Show Your Work” by Austin Kleon has inspired the creation of this blog. Derek Sivers pulled a lot of nuggets from that book and summarised them in his review. The review is very short and is definitely worth a read. Some of the best ideas are:

“Consistently post bits and pieces of your work, your ideas, and what you’re learning online”

“Don’t share absolutely everything. Put something out there because you think it might be helpful or entertaining.”

“Don’t show your lunch or your latte; show your work.” 

I’m not sure whether it is just me personally, or the fact that the NZ market is so small, that everyone keeps their tips to themselves. Perhaps operating in small country will do that. But it could be that I tend to be a very private person in general. I am looking forward to sharing more of my theories and strategies as I learn about .com investing.

.com is so large that we can share tips and learnings that will benefit the industry as a whole. The more people who understand domains the better, as it helps with liquidity, as Andrew Rosener (Drew) of MediaOptions has said many times.

From dipping my toe and having a look around the .com market, I think I am in for an awakening in terms of complexity in strategy and investment level. But there is so much opportunity.

I plan to blog VERY often, sharing my theories, thoughts, successes and failures along the way. Please follow along with me on this journey…

Please Follow and Connect!

Please join the mailing list on the side to get an alert when I post. Feel Free to leave a comment below.

You can also follow me on Twitter @NZDomainer. Feel free to tweet me and say you read the blog!

START HERE: What is this Domain Blog about?

Hey I’m Adrian, an entrepreneur and part time domainer from New Zealand. I specialise in our local ccTLD extension of .co.nz. I have been investing in NZ domains part time since around 2014. And more seriously since 2016.

You can read about my full domain journey here

I have learned how the domain market works in New Zealand, and had some good success. However there is just not enough expiring domain inventory / population / demand locally to make a full time income from it. So I want to branch out into new markets.

Adrian-Headshot

I have always stayed out of .com, due to the .co.nz market being more familiar to me. Also, with many other businesses to manage it was easier to focus on one niche (local NZ Domains) rather than the massive world of .com domain investing.

But now I want to branch out to .com. I would love to make an equivalent full time income from domaining. But I believe it just cant be done with New Zealand domains due to the small size of the market.

 

So I am going to be documenting my journey from newbie to success in .com.

Now, I am not a complete newbie domainer. While it has taken years, I have learned what makes a good domain name/brand. Well, a good, one word, resellable .co.nz domain. But I want to try my skills at .com.

I know the .com market is VERY different from the .co.nz market due to its size and liquidity. I will be a total .com newbie. I usually specialise in one word .co.nz domains. However I don’t have the budget to be buying one word .com domains (just yet ;).

So I will be starting “from scratch” at the bottom end of the .com market. After listening to every Domain Sherpa show, and reading every Rick Schwartz Blog post, I believe I know a bit about what makes a good .com.

But lets see it in action!

I am going to be documenting my .com journey from zero. I will be sharing my tactics, successes and failures. Please follow along here, and on Twitter.

My Twitter is @NZDomainer

Adrian – NZ Domainer